Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
FOX News
Dec 21, 2012 1:00pm PST
many people down there that do not have basic necessities, they took appear the port-a-potties from the donation hut where people get food and clothes and eat. they took the port-a-potty away. >>neil: how do they explain that? >>guest: they don't. they want did remove the whole area john 1. >>neil: they are aware the people are stranded? >>guest: they have in heat, no hot water, if you have electric you do not have a kitchen or a bathroom, and if you do there is mood because the sewage overflowed so it and not just seawater it was all kind of contaminations with health issues and everyone is turning a blind eye to this. they were there to see the houses that collapsed but not talk to the residents. >>neil: when you see these guy s file filing through the tv and high fiving each other. >>guest: i don't see it. i could not fill out the paper work because i got burned because of the chemicals in the air. they filled out my paperwork because i could not see because of my eye, and they filled it out and then they said i filled out the paperwork wrong. and they filled it out. >>neil: this
FOX News
Dec 27, 2012 1:00pm PST
import -- we pointed out somewhere around 65% of international trade hits the ports. we import cars, we import produce, we import oil and gas. explain how this will affect the prices for people watching right now of everything. >> well, it will be very significant in a lot of ways. we're talking about eleven ports, basically from boston pretty much all the way around to houston. the reason governor scott is concerned is there are four ports in florida that will be affected. this is containerized shipping. electronic goods, food stuff and things like that. it could be massive impact, especially in this -- we had retailers getting trouble getting back on track. it will affect everybody's pocketbook eventually. >> eric: tell us how it trickles down to the consumer. >> basically everything will become a lower supply. therefore, lower supply means higher prices. uncertainty about when purchases can be made and then imported into the united states. what happened after the port strike on the west coast in 2002, a lot of shippers made permanent arrangements to ship things in through the eas
FOX News
Dec 3, 2012 1:00pm PST
beach port complex for a lot of crucial ships entering the 7th day. it is a serious cause for alarm as in "santa claus." the longer it stays on the ship the less likely it lands on santa's sleigh. explain this. >>guest: right our biggest concern is we have ports shut down. a majority of the holiday merchandise has arrived in the united states right now there is the last big push to get the holiday merchandise to the stores and they are stuck on ships at sea. >>neil: if you don't follow this stuff, if this age of time inventory, retailers do not stack a lost stuff on their shelves, to save money and, also, to respond quickly to what is selling hot and what is not and a lot of this stuff on the ships is pretty hot, what could be affected for people. >>guest: it can be everything from wearing apparel, and consumer electronics, and foot wear, and home goods and folks are actually looking at bringing in spring merchandise so you are looking at patio furniture. >>neil: what would happen to the prices of those goods, then, if they are in short supply or zero supply. >>guest: well, in short su
FOX News
Dec 26, 2012 1:00pm PST
question. if you -- you used the right word, cripple the economy. the ports in this country are the backbone of our trade, both export and imports and i've read estimates of $100 billion or more comes in and out. so it cook devastating, and reverberate throughout the economy. retailers, wholesalers. food distributors, everybody would be affected by the strike if it goes forward. >> exactly what do the unions want and what is management willing to do? how far apart are the two groups? >> it's interesting. they're not really -- normally in a wage dispute with the union,ettes it's about wages and benefits but in this case it's not. what the unions are objecting to, according to the media reports i've been seeing, is they object to new kinds of work rules and new kinds of efficiencies that the port systems want to put in place to make the ports more productive, lower costs. that's happening -- you cover these markets every day. it's happening in every industry in america and they're objecting to putting in machinery, doing things that might take one worker rather than two. it's good for
FOX News
Dec 28, 2012 1:00pm PST
coast ports say hope through the weekend but the fight is far from over. phil keating has the latest from miami. phil? >> this just goes to show that two sides can in fact come to negotiated deal. it's great news for millions of american workers in the u.s. consumer supply chain as well as untold numbers of american consumers because all of the prices that they depend on might have gone up. bottom line, no strike on sunday. both sides remain mum so we don't know the details of this, temporary deal just yet. the sticking point had been container royalties paid to the longshoremen. the heavier the container, the more they got paid. owners wanted it capped alt last year's level, longshoremen did not. the container royalty payment issue has been agreed on in principle inside, electronics, clothing, components, airline parts, every consumer product you can think of. both exports and imports. a strike would have shortened supply and raised prices and hit the economy far harder than the port strike in california. >> there was a strike in long beach in los angeles a few weeks ago, jus
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5